What's happening at St. James now – live streaming (click the arrow on the left of the image to access the time-lapse videos)

11 April

It's a good job that we have a roof for the nest tray. Today's snowfall today would have left the birds very exposed!

7 April

It's likely to be quiet for a few weeks now. Four eggs have been laid and incubation is well underway, with the pair changing over 3-4 times in a 24-hour period. If things go to schedule, we should be looking for the first chick around 6 May.

3 April

4th egg at 23.35. Incubation usually begins on arrival of the penultimate egg and this started 2-3 days ago, so it looks as if 4 eggs will be the limit.

2 April

Lunchtime!

2 April

The male is spending more time on the eggs, but the female who is far larger, moves him off, as she can cover the eggs more easily. Looks like incubation has started, so possibly a fourth egg to come on Saturday.

1 April

Third egg at 10.49.

30 March

Second egg at 01.22. The visiting peregrine was around the church again in the afternoon.

28 March

The egg was left unattended for 4 hours this afternoon, with both birds returning at 18.40. I'm told this is normal behaviour. An egg remains viable for days provided it doesn't get warm from incubation, as it hasn't started to form. The female won't usually incubate until the penultimate egg has appeared, ensuring the eggs hatch within a day or two of each other. Until then, when she's on the nest, she isn't incubating as her 'brood patch' isn't in contact with the egg. She's just sitting over it for protection

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27 March

First egg this afternoon, at 16.15. She incubated until 19.03, then left. Expect the second in a couple of days. Keep watching and buy our book, or donate to the Lincs Bird Club who paid for the views you are now seeing!

26 March

The female spent much of the time on the nest. The pair mated on the gargoyle in the afternoon and the male brought prey for the female.

24 March

The female slept for a couple of hours on the nest last night, and this morning the pair went through an extended courtship sequence, with over an hour on the nest from around 07.40. She then returned and spent 1 hour 20 mins on the nest.

20 March

More courtship display. See the 8-minute video on YouTube HERE

17 March

Another visit by the pair mid-afternoon. After female left, the male sat on the same spot for almost 2 hours.

14 March

Another visit. There are now 3-4 visits each day, starting before dawn.

12 March

A short clip showing the pair copulating at 06.50. Watch the opening on the right of the picture. The female has been sitting on a gargoyle for some minutes when the male flies in and there is a brief union. Copulation often continues even after the first egg is laid.

9 March

Four visit by the female today – one with the male

8 March

Female visited the nest tray mid-morning, then the pair copulated on the spire crockets. Further brief visits this afternoon.

7 March

Another (or perhaps the same) visiting peregrine was chased away from the spire by the female this morning.

6 March

An early morning visit by the female. Interesting to see the point where the camera switches from infrared to daylight mode.

5 March

News of one of our 2017 brood. The female P7C was seen briefly in the nest tray at St Wulframs, Grantham. It seems as though their resident pair have moved house!

4 March

After a couple of quiet days, the pair were back on the nest tray this afternoon

28 February

A visiting peregrine that landed on the spire this afternoon was chased off by our residents.

27 February

Courting again! The female visits regularly each day now.

23 February

Further visits today. The pair are often seen to 'eat' gravel. It's thought this helps to clear fatty bits that may stick in the gizzard and also, for the female, provides her with calcium for her eggs.

22 February

Several visits from 06.35, including courtship.

21 February

3 visit by the female today.

11 February

First visit to the nest by our birds. They spent 13 minutes there, creating a depression in the gravel. Watch the full video HERE

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